Models are important and necessary, but they are still only as good as their suppositions and postulates. Altruists vs selfish might be good for game theory, but in reality these behaviors are not discrete. Altruism vis-a-vis selfishness is not a zero sum game. These exist within ingroups and simultaneously within individuals towards their ingroup.

Regardless of models, there has to be follow up showing actual evidence and actual examples of group selection in non-human societies including genetic analysis that makes a stronger case than that for individual selection. I’ve heard rumbling that such evidence exists. Perhaps you can point to some, but so far, I haven’t seen anything to sway me. I’m dubious.

In the terms I’ve adopted, the strongest ‘us’ wins out. Groups win by beating other groups and the genetic tendencies of any individual can determine whether a tribe lives or dies en masse.

This certainly looks like individual selection to me. What genetic tendencies are you citing? If you’re going to leverage this for group selection, please explain which traits are measured, and how the genetics is analyzed to distinguish between the two. Perhaps you do elsewhere.

Author of Darwin’s Apple: The Evolutionary Biology of Religion, a new take on the function and purpose of religion.

Author of Darwin’s Apple: The Evolutionary Biology of Religion, a new take on the function and purpose of religion. http://www.darwinsapple.com